Photo Album - The Carnegie Science Center

Photograph Album -
The Carnegie Science Center, Pittsburgh

Special Carnegie Science Center Topics and News

Click here for the Official Web Site of The Carnegie Science Center

Internet Web Site Master Index for the History of
The Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science, Pittsburgh

The newest museum to bear the Carnegie name, The Carnegie Science Center, opened to the public on Saturday Morning, 1991 October 5. It is the successor to The Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science / Buhl Science Center which was dedicated on Tuesday Evening, 1939 October 24 as this country's fifth major planetarium and Pittsburgh's science and technology museum from 1939 to 1991. The Carnegie Science Center is located on the North Shore of Pittsburgh's Lower North Side, just west and across Allegheny Avenue from Acrisure Stadium (originally known as Heniz Field), the newest home of the National Football League [NFL - AFC North] Pittsburgh Steelers professsional football team and the University of Pittsburgh's college football team, the Pitt Panthers. The Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science building is located one mile to the northeast, in Allegheny Center.

Photographs of, & Information regarding, The Carnegie Science Center

(Images Source: Friends of the Zeiss; Photographer: Glenn A. Walsh,
unless otherwise indicated)

1992 Promotional Video of The Carnegie Science Center

The Carnegie Science Center Building Exterior -
Front (Side facing Allegheny "T" Light Rail Rapid Transit Station):
Link 1 *** Link 2 (from T-Allegheny Station Platform Level) *** Link 3 (from T-Allegheny Station Mezzanine Level) *** Link 4 *** Link 5 *** Link 6 (Rangos Giant Cinema (formerly Rangos Omnimax Theater)
Rear (Side facing Ohio River): Link 1 *** Link 2 *** Link 3 *** Sundial *** U.S.S. Requin Submarine *** Henry Buhl, Jr. Observatory
PPG Science Pavillion: Link 1 *** Link 2 *** Link 3
Sports-Works Building

Body Works and Body Stage - On third floor, teaches about human anatomy and biology. (Transpara the Talking Glass Lady anatomy demonstration at the original Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science / Buhl Science Center)
Third floor also includes Discovery Lab.

Henry Buhl, Jr. Planetarium and Observatory (For a time, known as the Buhl Digital Dome) - Henry Buhl, Jr. Planetarium, second floor, The Carnegie Science Center
* Lobby Photos (2022 Nov.): Link 1 (With Antarctic Meteorite) *** Link 2 (With Meteor Crater Meteorite) *** Link 3 (With Antarctic & Meteor Crater Meteorites) *** Link 4 (With Antarctic Meteorite) *** Link 5 (With Antarctic & Meteor Crater Meteorites) *** Link 6 (With Planetary Weight Scale)
* Information on the original & historic Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science / Buhl Science Center, includng the historic Zeiss II Planetarium Projector (Property of the City of Pittsburgh):
Link 1 *** Link 2
* Astronomical Observatory - Henry Buhl, Jr. Observatory, fifth floor, The Carnegie Science Center.
Inside the dome is a 16-inch Meade LX200 Schmidt-Cassegrain Reflector Telescope -
Dome Photographs (2022 Nov.): Link 1 *** Link 2 *** Link 3
[Henry Buhl, Jr. Observatory closed to the public for the years 2020 to 2022, due to the COVID-19 Pandemic. Scheduled to open for 2023 season (4th Saturday evening of month, April through September, 8:45 p.m. EDT) on April 22. ]
* Information on original Buhl Planetarium Observatory (1941 to 1994), including the historic 10-inch Siderostat-type Refractor Telescope (Property of the City of Pittsburgh).

H2Oh! Why Our Rivers Matter - On the first floor, explores the envirpostonmental and conservation needs of our water environment.
Scale displaying body weight and weight of H2O in body: Link 1 *** Link 2 *** Link 3
Also see Historic Fairbanks-Morse Weight Scale.

Foucault Pendulum (Originally, and currently, displayed in the original Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science / Buhl Science Center building; for a time, displayed on the second floor of The Carnegie Science Center - Property of the City of Pittsburgh)

Mars: The Next Giant Leap (New exhibit as of Saturday, 2022 November 19): Blog-Post *** Photos
Classic, Display-Case Exhibit of the Planet Mars as displayed in the Hall of the Universe at the original Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science / Buhl Science Center (1950s to 1994). (Image Source: Friends of the Zeiss; Photographer: Francis G. Graham, Professor Emeritus of Physics, Kent State University).
Weight Scale - Fairbanks-Morse Planetary Weight Scale - In the second-floor lobby of the Henry Buhl, Jr. Planetarium. Allows visitors to determine their weight on the planet Mars, as well as on Earth, Earth's Moon, and Venus. (Originally displayed in the original Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science / Buhl Science Center - Property of the City of Pittsburgh)
Other Mars Exhibits & Programs at the original Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science / Buhl Science Center

Meteorite [Iron-Nickel] - Located in the second-floor lobby of the Henry Buhl, Jr. Planetarium. (Originally displayed at the original Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science / Buhl Science Center - Property of the City of Pittsburgh)

Meteorite discovered in Antarctica by University of Pittsburgh Professor William Cassidy, located in the second-floor Henry Buhl, Jr. Planetarium Lobby:
Link 1 *** Link 2 *** Link 3
In the background of the images in links 1 and 3 also show the fifth largest meteorite fragment from Arizona's Meteor Crater (Originally displayed at the original Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science / Buhl Science Center - Property of the City of Pittsburgh).

Miniature Railroad and Village - Located on the second floor. [Originally displayed at the home of Charles Bowdish in Brookville, Pennsylvania (1920 December), then moved to the original Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science (1954 December), before moving to The Carnegie Science Center (1992).]
Includes model of the historic Buhl Planetarium building, installed at the time of Buhl Planetarium's 75th anniversary: 2014 November.

Moon Rock (Lunar Sample #15499) on display at The Carnegie Science Center (second floor near the Henry Buhl, Jr. Planetarium), beginning in December of 2022 for at least five years, in conjunction with the newly-opened exhibit: "Mars: The Next Giant Leap". This lunar sample was collected during the mission of Apollo 15, 1971 July 26 to August 7. One of the two astronauts to land on the Moon during this mission was Lunar Module Pilot James B. Irwin, a native of the Beechview section of Pittsburgh. Commander David R. Scott was the other astronaut who landed on the Moon during the Apollo 15 mission; Command Module Pilot Alfred M. Worden remained in orbit in the Apollo Command Module.
Link 1 *** Link 2 *** Link 3
Information on other Pittsburgh displays of Moon Rocks, including two at the original Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science / Buhl Science Center in 1970 and 1989.

NETL Energy Zone - In partnership with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), on the fourth floor, this includes turning cranks to generate electricity. (Duquesne Light Company Stationary Bicycle at the original Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science / Buhl Science Center, where people could pedal to generate electricity and light-up progressively stronger light bulbs.)

Pittsburgh Regional Science and Engineering Fair (Originally the Pittsburgh Regional School Science and Engineering Fair in 1940 at the original Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science) - The third oldest Science Fair in the United States (the oldest regional Science Fair in a major metropolitan area; the two older fairs are state-wide fairs), under the affiliation of Science Service, Inc. which facilitates the International Science and Engineering Fair.

Science Stage and Rangos Giant Cinema, originally an Omnimax Theater - Entrances to both theaters on the first floor. (Little Science Theater / Lecture Hall at the original Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science / Buhl Science Center, included science films, demonstrations, and lectures.)

Space Place - Exhibit about Space and Astronomy, on both the first and second floors. (Hall of the Universe at the original Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science / Buhl Science Center included many astronomy exhibits, including classic, push-button, display-case exhibits.)
Photographs of front pages of Pittsburgh newspapers, announcing the landing of the first NASA astronauts on the Moon, Sunday, 1969 July 20:
Both Newspapers *** Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Morning Newspaper) *** The Pittsburgh Press (Afternoon Newspaper)

Submarine - U.S. Navy Submarine USS Requin (SS-481) - Moored in the Ohio River, adjacent to The Carnegie Science Center. (Originally exhibited by the Buhl Science Center)

Sundial - Human Sundial (human body used to tell time and date) in Science Park, adjacent to The Carnegie Science Center:
Link 1 *** Link 2 *** Link 3 *** Link 4 *** Link 5

Telescope - Four-inch Brashear Refractor Telescope (Originally displayed in the original Buhl Planetarium Library; later, displayed on the second floor of The Carnegie Science Center)

Tesla Coil in the Works Theater on the fourth floor. (Originally displayed in the original Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science / Buhl Science Center)

Wall Display of NASA Space Shuttle Astronaut Mike Fincke (Pittsburgh-area native), as being viewed by Francis G. Graham, Professor Emeritus of Physics, Kent State University. Mike Fincke was a student of Professor Graham at the original Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science / Buhl Science Center.
(Image Sources: Friends of the Zeiss; Francis G. Graham, Professor Emeritus of Physics, Kent State University)

Weight Scale - Fairbanks-Morse Planetary Weight Scale - In the second-floor lobby of the Henry Buhl, Jr. Planetarium. (Originally displayed in the original Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science / Buhl Science Center - Property of the City of Pittsburgh)
Also see H2O Weight Scale.

World Globe - Rand McNally Geo-Physical Relief Globe (Originally displayed in the original Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science / Buhl Science Center; later displayed on the fourth floor of The Carnegie Science Center).

Historic Zeiss II Planetarium Projector - On static display in first-floor Atrium Gallery of The Carnegie Science Center. (Originally utilized at the original Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science / Buhl Science Center - Property of the City of Pittsburgh)

In addition to the Four-inch Brashear Refractor Telescope*, the Foucault Pendulum*, and the World Globe*, some years ago The Carnegie Science Center also included an Animal Room (including a bee-hive and a chicken embryology exhibit*), Aquarium* on the fourth floor ( Annual Tropical Fish Show displayed at original Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science / Buhl Science Center), Computer Learning Lab*, and a WPXI-TV 11 Weather Center* (Items with an asterisk * had been previously operated and / or displayed at the original Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science / Buhl Science Center).

Allegheny Light Rail Transit T Rail Station, Allegheny Avenue at Reedsdale Street (one block north of The Carnegie Science Center, three blocks south of the Moonshot Space Museum, and four blocks southwest of the Community College of Allegheny County, Allegheny Campus (Monument Hill) -
Link 1 *** Link 2 *** Link 3 *** Link 4 *** Link 5

Original Science Center building:
The Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science /
Buhl Science Center
Allegheny Center, Norloth Side

Moonshot
Space Museum
North Side

K. Leroy Irvis Science Center
Community College of Allegheny County
Monument Hill, North Side
(Astronomical Observatory on top)


History of Andrew Carnegie
& Carnegie Libraries

Carnegie Institute /
Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh

Science Park View of
Downtown Pittsburgh's
Golden Triangle

Return to History of The Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science, Pittsburgh


Photograph Album - The Carnegie Science Center, Pittsburgh

Authored by Glenn A. Walsh
Web Page Edited By Glenn A. Walsh *** Sponsored By Friends of the Zeiss
Electronic Mail: < cscphoto@planetarium.cc > *** Internet Web Site Cover Page: < http://www.planetarium.cc >
This Internet Web Page: < https://andrewcarnegie.tripod.com/csc/photoalbum.html >
News: Astronomy, Space, Science: SpaceWatchtower Blog
2007 September

NEWS: Planetarium, Astronomy, Space, and Other Sciences

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Internet Web Site Master Index for the History of
The Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science, Pittsburgh

Other Internet Web Sites of Interest

History of The Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science, Pittsburgh

History of Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago

Astronomer, Educator, and Telescope Maker John A. Brashear

History of Andrew Carnegie and Carnegie Libraries

Historic Duquesne Incline cable-car railway, Pittsburgh

Disclaimer Statement: This Internet Web Site is not affiliated with the Andrew Carnegie Free Library,
Ninth Pennsylvania Reserves Civil War Reenactment Group, Henry Buhl, Jr. Planetarium and Observatory,
The Carnegie Science Center, The Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh/Carnegie Institute, or The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh.

This Internet, World Wide Web Site administered by Glenn A. Walsh.
Unless otherwise indicated, all pages in this web site are --
Copyright 2023, Glenn A. Walsh, All Rights Reserved.
Contact Web Site Administrator: < cscphoto@planetarium.cc >.

This Internet World Wide Web page created on 2007 September.
Last modified : Sunday, 23-Apr-2023 11:21:37 EDT.

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