History of Andrew Carnegie and Carnegie Libraries

New Carnegie Science Center building
(1991)

Original Science Center building:
The Buhl Planetarium &
Institute of Popular Science
(1939)

Carnegie
Music Hall

Carnegie Library
Lecture Hall

History of Andrew Carnegie
and Carnegie Libraries

Official Web Sites for:

Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh/
Carnegie Institute

Carnegie Musuem of
Natural History

Carnegie Musuem
of Art

Andy Warhol
(Art) Museum

Carnegie Library
of Pittsburgh

The History of Carnegie Libraries

Entrance to the Andrew Carnegie Free 
Library, Carnegie, Pa.

Western Pennsylvania Libraries

County of Allegheny *** The Carnegie Library of Pittsbusrgh

County of Beaver

Other Carnegie Libraries *** Academic/School Libraries

Andrew Carnegie and Carnegie Libraries Photo Album

Early Children's Services at Carnegie Libraries

The Carnegie Formula and Early Carnegie Libraries

Carnegie Libraries Worldwide 1881 - 1917

Library Grants, Presented by Andrew Carnegie,
in the Nineteenth Century

Number of Carnegie Libraries in the United States of America, by State, as of 1920

Library Grants in districts or territories of the United States of America

Potter, Chris. "You Had to Ask:
Where and when did Andrew Carnegie donate his first library?
And how many libraries were donated in all? "

Column: You Had to Ask.
Pittsburgh City Paper 2000 Feb. 9.

Model of Ancient Library at Alexandria, Egypt as displayed in Carl Sagan's
"Cosmos" media series, including PBS television series and book, as well as
planetarium show and temporary museum exhibit (both shown at
Pittsburgh's original Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science).




Early Carnegie Libraries --

Western Pennsylvania Libraries

County of Allegheny *** The Carnegie Library of Pittsbusrgh

County of Beaver

Other Carnegie Libraries *** Academic/School Libraries

Model of Ancient Library at Alexandria, Egypt as displayed in Carl Sagan's
"Cosmos" media series, including PBS television series and book, as well as
planetarium show and temporary museum exhibit (both shown at
Pittsburgh's original Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science).



Pennsylvania - County of Allegheny


Andrew Carnegie Free Library and Music Hall, Carnegie, Pennsylvania (May 1, 1901):
Official Web Site *** Photo Album *** Civil War Museum

Library History: Link 1 *** Link 2 *** Link 3 *** Link 4 *** Link 5 *** Link 6 *** Photo Album

Declaration of Trust Agreement, Executed by Andrew Carnegie,
Legally Creating the Andrew Carnegie Free Library

Petition to Amend Declaration of Trust Agreement
Approved by Orphans' Court June 6, 2000

By-Laws of the Andrew Carnegie Free Library
Prior to Amendment of Declaration of Trust
(After June 6, 2000, By-Laws were further amended
to comply with Trust Amendments.)

Early History of the Andrew Carnegie Free Library
Address of Glenn A. Walsh During Commemoration of Centennial
of the Dedication of the Andrew Carnegie Free Library
Library Music Hall: 2002 October 8, 7:00 p.m.(EDST)

Early Children's Services of Carnegie Libraries

Programme of Dedication
Attended by Andrew Carnegie and John A. Brashear:
Cover
Programme


Carnegie Free Library of Braddock, Braddock, Pennsylvania (March 30, 1889):
Official Web Site *** Photo Album
Edgar Thomson Works, Andrew Carnegie's First Steel Mill in Braddock, Pennsylvania


Carnegie Free Library of Allegheny, Allegheny, Pennsylvania (February 20, 1890):
Official Web Site *** Photo Album and History


Carnegie Free Library of Duquesne, Pennsylvania (1904-1968)
Original Carnegie Library building razed in June of 1968.


Carnegie Free Library of McKeesport, Pennsylvania (July 15, 1902):
Official Web Site


Carnegie Free Library of Swissvale, Pennsylvania (February 4, 1918):
Official Web Site *** Photo Album


Carnegie Library of Homestead, Munhall, Pennsylvania (November 5, 1898):
Official Web Site *** Library History *** Photo Album


C. C. Mellor Memorial Library, Edgewood, Pennsylvania (Carnegie Grant Given: May 8, 1914)
Official Web Site


Oakmont Carnegie Library, Oakmont, Pennsylvania (May 17, 1901):
Official Web Site *** Library History


Wilkinsburg Public Library, Wilkinsburg, Pennsylvania (September 11, 1899) --
Opened September 11, 1899 as The Carnegie Free Library of Wilkinsburg,
a branch of the Carnegie Free Library of Braddock:

Official Web Site *** Library History



The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh (1895) --

Andrew Carnegie donated Main Library building (which also included Museum of Natural History, Museum of Art, and Music Hall; 1907 addition included Dinosaur Hall and a Lecture Hall; Scaife Gallery added to Museum of Art in the 1960s) and eight neighborhood branches. Additionally, Allegheny Regional Branch started as original Carnegie Library building for Allegheny City, across Allegheny River from Downtown Pittsburgh. Pittsburgh annexed Allegheny City in 1907; Carnegie Free Library of Allegheny joined Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh system in 1956.

Original Charter and City of Pittsburgh Ordinances Officially Creating
"The Carnegie Free Libraries of the City of Pittsburgh"
Pages 1 and 2 include letter from Andrew Carnegie,
offering to build Main Library and several branch libraries for Pittsburgh:

Page 1 *** Page 2 *** Page 3 *** Page 4 *** Page 5

1895 Dedication of The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
and Carnegie Institute,
Including Andrew Carnegie's Dedicatory Address in its Entirety

Early Children's Services of Carnegie Libraries

Sebak, Rick. "The Carnegie Library, The children’s department at Carnegie Library’s main branch has always been a wonderous place." Column.
Pittsburgh Magazine 2011 February.

Chronology: Andrew Carnegie's Institutions in Pittsburgh --

1890 February 20 - Dedication of Carnegie Free Library of Allegheny (later Allegheny Regional Branch, Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh) as nation's first publicly-funded Carnegie Library (third Carnegie Library)
1890 February 24 - Andrew Carnegie forms Carnegie Free Libraries of the City of Pittsburgh (modified 1890 May 26)
1895 November 5 - Dedication of The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
1896 March 2 (Deed of Trust) - Andrew Carnegie forms Carnegie Institute: Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Carnegie Museum of Art
1900 - Formation of Carnegie Technical Schools, later Carnegie Institute of Technology, now Carnegie Mellon University
1907 - Large expansion of Carnegie Museums (including construction of original Dinosaur Hall)
1967 - Opening of Scaife Gallery expansion of Carnegie Museum of Art
1967 - Carnegie Institute of Technology merges with Mellon Institute to form Carnegie Mellon University
1987 January 1 - Merger of Buhl Planetarium and Carnegie Museums
1991 October 5 - Opening of The Carnegie Science Center
1994 May 15 - Opening of Andy Warhol Museum


Main Library in Schenley Park, Oakland(November 5, 1895):
Official Library Web Site *** Main Branch (Oakland) Web Site *** Photo Album & History

Early Children's Services of Carnegie Libraries

Sebak, Rick. "The Carnegie Library, The children’s department at Carnegie Library’s main branch has always been a wonderous place." Column.
Pittsburgh Magazine 2011 February.


Allegheny Regional Branch (February 20, 1890):
Official Web Site *** Photo Album and History

* 2007 Dec. 2 - NEW WEB SITE:
Website for and by patrons of the
Allegheny Regional Branch
of the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh

To restore library service in America's first
publicly funded Carnegie Library !!!


Lawrenceville Branch (May 10, 1898):

The Lawrenceville Library is a true library pioneer:

Ř       First of more than one hundred neighborhood branch libraries built by Andrew Carnegie in the United States

Ř       First specifically designed and constructed library Children's Room

Ř       First library specifically designed to allow the public direct access to the book stacks, including a central circulation desk

Ř       Building design became a model for Carnegie Libraries throughout the world

 

Official Web Site

Histories --

Early Children's Services of Carnegie Libraries

O'Neill, Brian. "Readers would do well to book this tour." Column.
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette 2010 Sept. 2.

"...a reader called to alert me to Bookstore Tourism...
"and this month there will be a Gilligan-like three-hour tour of independent stores here in Pittsburgh...
"That's all because Karen Lillis, a book-lover who moved here five years ago from New York, doesn't want to see our cultural landscape slide. She's also organizing a library tour -- including the old Allegheny Library, the Braddock Carnegie and the Lawrenceville branch of the Carnegie -- on Sunday, Sept. 12."

Mellon, Steve. "Carnegie Library, Lawrenceville branch." On-Line Column.
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette On-Line 2009 Oct. 12.
On-Line, Interactive, Panaoramic Photograph of Interior of Historic Lawrenceville Branch, Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh--providing 360-degree view of the first Carnegie Library neighborhood branch and prototype for all other neighborhood branch libraries.

Zlatos, Bill. "War of words begins over closing, downsizing libraries."
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review 2009 Oct. 11.

Wills, Rick. "Lawrenceville library users disappointed."
Pittsburgh Tribune-Review 2009 Oct. 11.

From the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Pittsburgh - 2003 March 2:
Carnegie's Library Legacy -
The Carnegie struggles with honoring the past while serving the present and future

By Patricia Lowry, Post-Gazette Architecture Critic
History of Lawrenceville Library, "A first for Lawrenceville," two-thirds way into feature article.

From the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Pittsburgh - 2002 October 23:
For decades, Lawrenceville library's basement has concealed a mystery
Tale of the tombstone

By Johnna A. Pro, Post-Gazette Staff Writer

 

Photo of Library Front and More Information about Library Tombstone:

< http://www.ghostvillage.com/legends/2003/legends9_01112003.shtml >
 

For historic Lawrenceville Library news archives:

A.D. 2004


West End Branch (January 31, 1899):

Photograph

Official Web Site *** West End Branch Friends of the Library

Early Children's Services of Carnegie Libraries

Walsh, Glenn A. "Historic Plaque Sought: West End Branch, Carnegie Library ." Blog Post.
SpaceWatchtower 2012 Oct. 25.

The Friends of the Library, West End Branch, The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, has filed an application nominating the West End Branch of The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh to receive a historic plaque offered by the Pittsburgh History and Landmarks Foundation.


Wylie Avenue Branch (Now Hill District Branch) (June 1, 1899)
Not presently housed in original Carnegie Library building. Wylie Avenue Branch of Carnegie Library was originally located on a hill overlooking Centre Avenue at 1911 Wylie Avenue. This Carnegie Library building is now used as the First Muslim Mosque of Pittsburgh, but "Carnegie Library" is still carved above the main entrance.:

Official Web Site


Hazelwood Branch (August 15, 1900):
Official Web Site *** Photo Album and History

For historic Hazelwood Library news archives:

A.D. 2004 *** A.D. 2003

Also visit the Save Hazelwood Library web site at:

< http://andrewcarnegie.tripod.com/hazelwood >


Mount Washington Branch (May 31, 1900):
Official Web Site


East Liberty Branch (October 10, 1905)
Largest branch built at that time; designed to serve population of 75,000.
Original Carnegie Library building razed:
Official Web Site


South Side Branch (January 30, 1908)
Last branch financed by original Carnegie gift to city:
Official Web Site


Homewood Branch (March 10, 1910)
By far, largest of original Carnegie branches:
Official Web Site



Pennsylvania - County of Beaver


Carnegie Free Library of Beaver Falls (1902 to Present) -
Now part of the Beaver County Library System

On 1899 August 15, Andrew Carnegie provided a grant of $50,000 to construct a public library in Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania on the Beaver River. No previous public library had existed in Beaver Falls, prior to the Carnegie grant. The Library opened to the public in 1902, and today the Carnegie Free Library continues serving the residents of Beaver Falls and also is the Research Center for Beaver County.

Carnegie Free Library of Beaver Falls: Link 1 * Link 2 *** Research Center for Beaver County *** Beaver County Library System

Carnegie Free Library Newsletter

Photographs of Library: Photo 1 *** Photo 2 *** Photo 3 *** Photo 4


Carnegie Library of Midland -
Now part of the Beaver County Library System

On 1914 May 8, Andrew Carnegie provided a grant of $20,000 for a public library in Midland, Pennsylvania on the Ohio River. No previous public library had existed in Midland, prior to the Carnegie grant. Today, the Carnegie Library continues serving the residents of Midland, as part of the Beaver County Library System.

Carnegie Library of Midland: Link 1 * Link 2 *** Research Center for Beaver County *** Beaver County Library System

Photographs of Library: Photo 1 *** Photo 2 *** Photo 3



Other Libraries, Originated with a Grant from Andrew Carnegie --

List of select web sites regarding Carnegie Libraries in specific
states, cities, and other locations.


Albany, Oregon Downtown Carnegie Library (1914 to Present)

On 1911 April 8, Andrew Carnegie provided a grant of $12,500 to provide a public library in the community of Albany, Oregon. No previous library had existed in Albany. The Carnegie grant was on the condition that the grant amount be matched by the town. The final cost of the library building was $20,000. The building was dedicated on 1914 June 26.

Library Web Site *** Library History *** Friends of the Albany Public Library


Barrie, Ontario, Canada (1917 June to 1996 December)
Carnegie Library building now used as the MacLaren Art Centre (2001 September to Present)

History of Barrie Public Library *** History of Library Building


Binghamton, New York (1904 October to 2000 November 4) -
Originally Binghamton Public Library
Now part of Broome County Public Library

The Binghamton Public Library, established prior to receiving a Carnegie grant, did receive a grant of $75,000 on 1902 Apirl 26 from Andrew Carnegie for construction of a large classical revival library building; the library opened to the public in October of 1904. In 1985, Broome County took over operation of the Library from the City of Binghamton. On 2000 November 5, after years of fund raising, a new 72,000 square-foot library structure replaced the 23,500 square-foot Carnegie Library building. Due to budget cutbacks by the City of Binghamton, the remaining four neighorhood branch libraries within the city closed on 2002 December 31.

Photograph of Original Carnegie Library *** Library History *** Library Web Site


Clinton, Iowa: Clinton Public Library (1904 to Present) -

Andrew Carnegie provided a grant of $45,000 for construction of a new public library building in Clinton, Iowa, on 1901 August 24. There was a public library in Clinton prior to the Carnegie Grant.

The building continues to operate as a public library for the citizens of Clinton and vicinity. However, at least since 2002, there has been consideration for building a new library building or rehabilitating a former school for library service, possibly outside of the downtown Clinton area. A Preservation Commission in Clinton, as well as the Iowa State Historic Preservation Office and the State Historical Society of Iowa, are working to convince public officials to rehabilitate the historic Carnegie Library building rather than build a new public library building.


Dallas, Oregon Carnegie Library Building (1911 to Present)

Andrew Carnegie provided $10,000 for a public library to be constructed in Dallas, Oregon on 1911 December 7. A public library did exist in Dallas, prior to the Carnegie grant. Today, this Carnegie Library building is being used as a Children's Center, a child-resource referral center which is still an anchor for the community.

Early library photograph from postcard
The reverse side of the postcard says: Pub. by Patton Post Card Co., Salem, Oregon".

Information on the Dallas Public Library


Carnegie-Stout Public Library, Dubuque, Iowa (1902 to Present)

Andrew Carnegie provided $71,500 for a public library to be constructed in Dubuque, Iowa on 1901 January 12. A public library did not exist in Dubuque, prior to the Carnegie grant. Although demand for a public library in the 1890s, when Dubuque was the largest and most prosperous city in Iowa, grew from the existence of a subscription library, the Young Men's Literary Association, which dated back to the 1850s.

The Carnegie-Stout library name comes from both the building donor, Andrew Carnegie, and the donor of the library property, former Dubuque Mayor Frank D. Stout.

The Carnegie-Stout Public Library opened to the public on 1902 October 20. An addition to the building opened in 1981. In 2009, this Carnegie Library building is being renovated and restored.

Library History and Photo *** City Designated Landmark: Photo; Historic and Architectural info

Library Photos and General Information *** Library Web Site Cover Page and Photo of 1981 Addition

Additional Library Information: Link 1 *** Link 2

2009 March 10


Elwood Township Carnegie Library, Ridge Farm, Illinois (1910)
Andrew Carnegie provided a grant of $9,000, on April 28, 1909, for construction of a new library building in Ridge Farm, Illinois. A library had already been established in Ridge Farm, and this library continues to exist in the Carnegie Library building.
General Information *** Management Profile: 2003-2004


Fort Worth Public Library, Fort Worth, Texas (1901)
Fort Worth, which did not previously have a public library, received a Carnegie grant of $50,000 on June 30, 1899:
Official Web Site *** Library History


Gadsden, Alabama
(Carnegie Grant: 1903 November 18; Razed in late 1960s)

Andrew Carnegie provided a grant of $10,000, on 1903 November 18, to construct a Carnegie Library in Gadsden, Alabama, a town which had not previously had a public library. This beautiful structure was demolished in the late 1960s. Here are images of a postcard, which displays this lovely building:

Color Photo of Library (front of postcard) *** Rear of Postcard


Granby Public Library, Granby, Massachusetts (1917 to Present)

The Carnegie Corporation of New York provided a grant of $5,000, on 1916 March 31, for construction of a public library building in the small town of Granby, Massachusetts. Granby did have a library prior to the Carnegie grant.

The Library opened to the public in December of 1917 and continues to serve town residents to this day. However, a larger structure is needed, and, in 2006, Granby was placed on the Construction Waiting List of the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners, for a new structure. It is unclear what may happen to the original Carnegie library building, as it is thought that the new building would be built on the present library site.

Celebration of the 90th anniversary of the Granby Public Library (also see Letter of Congratulations) is scheduled for 2007 December 1, Saturday from 10:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. The celebration is to include an Andrew Carnegie interpreter and the burying of a time capsule. For the celebration, the Library is soliciting congratulatory postcards and messages from anyone interested in historic Carnegie Libraries, particularly from other Carnegie Libraries, at the following addresses:

Granby Public Library
1 Library Lane
Granby, MA 01033
Electronic Mail: Janice McArdle, Youth Service Librarian < tjmcardle@comcast.net >
Telephone: (413) 467-3320

Library Web Site *** Granby Public Library page from New England Carnegies Web Site.

Photos of Library: Link 1 (3 photos) *** Link 2 *** Link 3

Letter of Congratulations on Library's 90th Anniversary: 2007 December


Lackawanna Public Library, Lackawanna, New York (1922)
Now part of the Buffalo & Erie County Public Libraries.
Lackawanna, which did not previously have a public library, received a Carnegie grant of $30,000 on 1917 May 3. The Lackawanna Public Library was one of the last Carnegie libraries constructed; it opened to the public in 1922. The Carnegie Corporation of New York ended the grant program, for construction of libraries, in 1917:
Official Web Page and Library History


Lewiston City Library, Lewiston, Idaho (1903)
The Lewiston City Library, which pre-dates its Carnegie grant, received a Carnegie grant of $10,000 on March 27, 1903:
Official Library Web Site *** Carnegie Library (branch)

Photograph of original Carnegie Library

From the Lewiston Morning Tribune, Lewiston, Idaho - 1999 October 3:
Lewiston City Library Hires New Library Director;
Original Carnegie Library Closed Sept. 30, 1999


Mancelona (Township), Michigan (1916)

The Mancelona Township Library was founded about the year 1883 and had its location in the former town hall. Daniel Foote was one of the librarians, taking the position while still going to high school. The library was moved to its present location in the year 1916, after the completion of the present Carnegie Library Building. Mancelona, Michigan received a grant of $10,000, from the Carnegie Corporation of New York, for a new public library building on 1916 January 5. As of a 1997 survey, this building continues to serve the community as a public library.

Mancelona Township Library *** Library Web Site


Mapleton Public Library
Mapleton, Minnesota
(1907 to Present)

On 1905 March 25, Andrew Carnegie provided a $5,000 grant to construct a new public library building in the city of Mapleton. This small town in south central Minnesota already had an existing public library at that time. The Mapleton Public Library is now part of the Blue Earth County Library System.

Mapleton City Administrator Patty Woodruff notes that the inscription on the front of the library building says "Pvblic Library", using the letter "v" instead of the letter "u." Many people have questioned why it was inscribed in this way.

Mapleton's library building is not the only case where this use of the letter "v", in place of the letter "u," can be seen. Many other Victorian-era buildings, often found in the larger cities, also have this curious switch in letters.

It seems that the reason for this may be due to the common origin of the letters "u" and "v," from the Semitic letter "Waw." In early Latin, "V" was an abbreviated form of the Greek letter "upsilon" ("Y") and used to represent both the "u" sound and the consonant "w." Modern use of the letters "u" and "v" evolved by the eighteenth century, to distinquish between the vowel and consonant sounds -- more information.

As many Victorian-era buildings were constructed in a classical style of architecture, it was probably the choice of the architect to use the letter "v" as the classical version of the letter "u," to maintain consistency and give the aura of the classical era.

Mapleton Public Library - Photograph and More Information

2008 Aug. 28


Mitchell, South Dakota Carnegie Library
(Public Library: 1903 to 1970)
Now known as the Carnegie Resource Center

On 1902 January 10, Andrew Carnegie granted $12,000 for construction of a public library in Mitchell, South Dakota. The building was constructed mostly of quartzite stone, quarried in nearby Spencer, South Dakota. The building includes a dome framed of wood and plastered on the inside. The interior includes beautiful oak woodwork with an ornate grill dividing the lobby and what was the former library stack room and also including a red brick fireplace. This new Carnegie Library opened to the public in the Summer of 1903.

In 1940, as part of the Works Progress Administration Art Project, a Sioux Indian-inspired mural titled, Sun and Rain Clouds over Hills, was painted on the inside of the Library's dome. His first mural painting, it was painted by world renowned Yanktonais Nakota Sioux artist Oscar Howe.

In 1960, a brick (as quartzite stone was no longer available) addition was added to the Library to meet growing needs. However, even more space was needed by 1970 when the city decided to build a new Public Library building at 221 North Duff Street.

The original Carnegie Library building has had several uses since 1970, including as the Oscar Howe Cultural Center, an arts center (circa 1997), and a YWCA facility. By 2006, the building was vacant and a year later the city decided to sell the building, for one dollar, to a local consortium composed of the historical society, genealogical society and arts council. Now called the Carnegie Resource Center, these three groups are taking-up the challenge of restoring and reusing this historic Carnegie Library building, for the benefit of the people of Mitchell, South Dakota.

Carnegie Resource Center *** Library History *** \ Library Photo Gallery *** Current Mitchell Public Library


Newnan, Georgia Carnegie Library
(Public Library: 1904 to 1987; 2009 to Present)

Andrew Carnegie provided a grant of $10,000, on 1901 December 30, for construction of a Carnegie Library building facing the town square in Newnan, Georgia. A teenager from this Georgia town actually sought this library grant directly from Andrew Carnegie! Given early in the Carnegie Library grant program, this was one of the first Carnegie Library grants in the state of Georgia and was provided to a town which had not previously had a public library. It is also, likely, the oldest surviving Carnegie Library building in the state. The cornerstone for the Library was laid on 1903 August 4. The Carnegie Library opened to the public in 1904.

A larger, modern library replaced this Carnegie Library in 1987, three miles from the center of town. The Carnegie Library building later became an overflow courtroom for the County Courthouse, located across the square. As of May of 2007, the building is empty, and concerned citizens are seeking a new public use for the building that would be more complementary to its original use, according to Carol Burke, Communications Chair of the citizens group “Friends of the Carnegie.”

As of August of 2007, through the efforts of the “Friends of the Carnegie” citizens group, the mayor and city council of Newnan, Georgia have agreed to return the historic Newnan Carnegie Library building to use as a public library. The Newnan Carnegie Library reopening ceremony occurred on the evening of 2009 September 15 (see Grand Reopening Slide Show). At that time, the Library included a few unique distinctions;

1) Carnegie Library which has never been enlarged and, hence, the original building's historic exterior is completely intact;

2) The only Carnegie Library to be replaced with a newer structure, original building used for another purpose, then returned to use as a public library;

3) Oldest Carnegie Library in the state of Georgia.

Newnan
Carnegie Library

Newnan
Carnegie Library
Foundation

SLIDE SHOW: Grand Re-Opening of
Carnegie Library, Newnan, GA

***

Photos & Documents Related to Newnan Carnegie Library

Postcard Photo of Carnegie Library - 1904
(Click on building image for postcard capiton on reverse side and additional info.)

Newnan, Georgia Carnegie Library
Past and Future
By Friends of the Carnegie, Newnan, Georgia
2007 October

Carnegie Library, Newnan, Georgia Survey of "Public Library Roles" - October 2007
By Friends of the Carnegie, Newnan, Georgia:
Public Survey *** Survey Results and Needs Assessment

* 2007 Oct. 17 - City of Newnan, Georgia:
CARNEGIE LIBRARY SURVEY NOW AVAILABLE ONLINE
Carnegie Survey By The City of Newnan’s Carnegie Library Committee
Take the Survey

* 2007 Oct. 9 - Public Endorsement:
Major Milestone:
Public Library Service to Return to the
Carnegie Library in Newnan, Georgia

By Glenn A. Walsh
First Carnegie Library, in history of Carnegie Libraries, to return to public library service, after several years in a different use.

Newnan-Coweta Public Library

Newnan
Carnegie Library

Newnan
Carnegie Library
Foundation

SLIDE SHOW: Grand Re-Opening of
Carnegie Library, Newnan, GA

***

News Articles:

Donaberger, Mitch. "Lack of money does not close the book on every Carnegie library."
Point Park News Service 2009 Nov. 12.

"'Medical Mondays' to begin at Carnegie."
Times-Herald, Newnan GA 2009 Nov. 5.

Walsh, Glenn A, "Proposed Closure of Carnegie Libraries." Address.
Annual Public Hearing: Allegheny Regional Asset District Board of Directors 2009 Oct. 21.
Proposed closings of five branch libraries of The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh and reopening of Newnan, Georgia Carnegie Library after 22 years.

Walsh, Glenn A, "Proposed Closure of Carnegie Libraries." Address. Printed Addendum to Statement.
Special Meeting: Allegheny Regional Asset District Board of Directors 2009 Oct. 21.
State requirement of public libraries to comply with Sunshine Act and Right-to-Know Law.

Walsh, Glenn A, "Carnegie Library Closings." Address.
Allegheny County Library Association Board of Directors 2009 Oct. 19.
Proposed closings of five branch libraries of The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh and reopening of Newnan, Georgia Carnegie Library after 22 years.

Skinner, Winston. "Carnegie expert uses Newnan's example to save libraries."
Times-Herald, Newnan GA 2009 Oct. 19.
Also see public statement.

"The Carnegie introduces honor book system."
Times-Herald, Newnan, Georgia 2009 Oct. 14.
Newly reopened Carnegie Library in Newnan, Georgia; first Carnegie Library building--and probably the first library building of any type--to close (in 1987), be reused for another purpose(as a courthouse annex), then converted back to library service.

Walsh, Glenn A, "Carnegie Library’s Plan to Close Branch Libraries." Address.
Pittsburgh City Council 2009 Oct. 7.
Proposed closings of five branch libraries of The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh and reopening of Newnan, Georgia Carnegie Library after 22 years.
Also see news article.

Goldberg, Beverly and Sean Fitzpatrick. "Georgia Town Returns to Its Carnegie Library Roots."
American Libraries Magazine On-Line & Electronic Newsletter 2009 Sept. 23.
Newnan, Georgia Carnegie Library reopens after being closed for 22 years. This library made history by being the first Carnegie Library building, and probably the first library building of any type, to close, be reused for another purpose (as a courthouse annex), then be converted back to library service!

Blumenstein, Lynn. "Library broke from county system to focus on local needs."
Library Journal On-Line 2009 Sept. 21.
Newnan, Georgia Carnegie Library reopens after being closed for 22 years. This library made history by being the first Carnegie Library building, and probably the first library building of any type, to close, be reused for another purpose (as a courthouse annex), then be converted back to library service!

"Carnegie celebration continues with brown bag lecture."
Times-Herald, Newnan GA 2009 Sept. 17.
Newnan, Georgia Carnegie Library reopens after being closed for 22 years. This library made history by being the first Carnegie Library building, and probably the first library building of any type, to close, be reused for another purpose (as a courthouse annex), then be converted back to library service!

Richardson, Elizabeth. "City reopens historic library."
Times-Herald, Newnan GA 2009 Sept. 16.
Newnan, Georgia Carnegie Library reopens after being closed for 22 years. This library made history by being the first Carnegie Library building, and probably the first library building of any type, to close, be reused for another purpose (as a courthouse annex), then be converted back to library service!

"The Historic Grand Re-Opening Week of the Carnegie." Internet Page.
Newnan Carnegie Library Foundation Web Site September 15th – 19th, 2009.

* "Carnegie Library Makes Preservation History!"
National Trust for Historic Preservation 2008 May 27.
More information about Carnegie Library, Newnan GA.

* 2007 Dec. 24 - The Times-Herald, Newnan GA, Page 1:
U.S.'s first Carnegie Library in jeopardy
By W. WINSTON SKINNER
Newnan, Georgia, which moved library services out of historic Carnegie Library building
20 years ago in favor of new library structure, plans to undo this mistake
by restoring library service to historic Carnegie Library building.
This will be the first Carnegie Library building to have library service restored,
after the building was used for an alternate purpose (courthouse annex).
More information about Newnan Carnegie Library

* 2007 Dec. 17 - Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Page B-1:
Library's plan to build anew on North Side meets strong opposition
By Diana Nelson Jones
Regarding plans to abandon historic Allegheny Regional Library building,
built by Andrew Carnegie in the neighborhood where he grew-up.
in favor of smaller library structure three blocks away.

* 2007 Dec. 17 - The Times-Herald, Newnan GA, Page 1:
Carnegie Friends support Pittsburgh
By W. WINSTON SKINNER
Newnan, Georgia, which moved library services out of historic Carnegie Library building
20 years ago in favor of new library structure, plans to undo this mistake
by restoring library service to historic Carnegie Library building.
This will be the first Carnegie Library building to have library service restored,
after the building was used for an alternate purpose (courthouse annex).
More information about Newnan Carnegie Library

* 2007 Dec. 17 - Public Statement before
Pittsburgh City Council by Glenn A. Walsh - Public hearing regarding restoring library service to Allegheny Regional Branch of The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh will be Tue., Dec. 18, 2007 at 5:00 p.m. in the New Hazlett Theater on the North Side:

Prepared Text *** Large-Print Version

* 2007 Oct. 30 - The Times-Herald, Newnan GA, Page 1:
Mayor offers his support for library in Carnegie
By W. WINSTON SKINNER
More information.

* 2007 Oct. 29 - The Times-Herald, Newnan GA, Page 1:
Carnegie Friends tallying surveys
By W. WINSTON SKINNER
More information.

* 2007 Oct. 27 - The Times-Herald, Newnan GA, Page 1:
Carnegie Friends, neighbors meeting Sunday
By W. WINSTON SKINNER
More information.

* 2007 Oct. 24 - The Times-Herald, Newnan GA:
Editorial
Restore Carnegie to its original use as a public library
More information.

* 2007 Oct. 23 - The Times-Herald, Newnan GA, Page 1:
Carnegie Library prospects hailed by an expert on Carnegie libraries, Glenn A. Walsh.
By W. WINSTON SKINNER
(Article appeared under banner headline, at top of first page.)
More information.

* 2007 Oct. 19 - The Times-Herald, Newnan GA:
City to phase out its library funding
for County library; City plans to reopen Carnegie Library in town square.
By ELIZABETH RICHARDSON
More information.

* 2007 Oct. 17 - City of Newnan, Georgia:
CARNEGIE LIBRARY SURVEY NOW AVAILABLE ONLINE
Carnegie Survey By The City of Newnan’s Carnegie Library Committee
Take the Survey

* 2007 Oct. 12 - The Times-Herald, Newnan GA:
Committee re-examining uses for Carnegie building
By ELIZABETH RICHARDSON
More information.

* 2007 Oct. 11 - The Times-Herald, Newnan GA:
Editorial
Let's all come together to ensure bright future for Carnegie Building
More information.


Oregon City, Oregon Carnegie Library (1913 to 1995; 2010 to Present):

On 1911 December 23, Andrew Carnegie approved a grant of $12,500 toward the construction of a new library building in Oregon City, Oregon, a suburb of Portland. This was half of the estimated construction cost; the City agreed to pay the remainder. Several attempts at forming a permanent city library led to approval of a special library tax in 1910, which was one of Andrew Carnegie's prerequisites for his library donation. The Library opened to the public on 1913 June 21.

According to Oregon City resident Jolein Vona, the City moved the Library into "temporary" leased quarters (with 13,000 square feet of space) in 1995, due to the small size of the original Carnegie Library building (6500 square feet of space). A series of bond measures were placed on the ballot, which would provide the Library with the funds to build a larger library; all of these bond measures failed.

Ms. Vona, in a 2010 July 6 electronic mail message to the author, continued that "The Carnegie Library was renovated by the City and was used for a series of community purposes, such as art gallery and concert venue." However, in the Spring of 2010, the Library lost their leased space and had no choice but to return to the Carnegie Library building, which coincidentally occurred 2010 June 21, the Library's 97th anniversary! This is the second Carnegie Library building (and probably the second library building of any type) to be reused as a public library, after being repurposed earlier; the first Carnegie Library where this has occurred is in Newnan, Georgia, where their Carnegie Library reopened on 2009 September 15.

According to Ms. Vona, about 90 percent of Oregon City residents stated that they wished the original Carnegie Library building to be used as a library, in reply to a City request, the previous Winter, for public input on the best future use of the building. However, according to Ms. Vona, the Library and City have been in negotiations with the School District for the Library to purchase a former elementary school (close to the original Carnegie Library building). Hence, the Library management has stated that the original Carnegie Library building is too close to be used as a branch library and the Library has no further plans for the original building. However, as of the Summer of 2010, the purchase of the school building for the Library has not occurred. Ms. Vona believes most residents would prefer the Library to remain in the original Carnegie Library building.

History of Libraries in Oregon City *** Oregon City Library *** Friends of the Oregon City Public Library

Mayes, Steve. "Oregon City library temporarily moves to Carnegie Center, reopens Monday."
The Oregonian, Portland 2010 June 16.

Weinstein, Nathalie. "Oregon City library moving for mall renovation."
DJC Oregon, Daily Journal of Commerce 2010 May 12.


Pekin, Illinois Carnegie Library (1903 to 1974):

Andrew Carnegie donated $17,500, on 1900 October 8, to build a fairly unique library structure, which included a dome and a tile roof. The Pekin Carnegie Library, which was not the town's first public library, opened in 1903. The library closed and the building was demolished in 1974.

Photo and more info on Carnegie Library building (scroll-down to Pekin)

Pekin Public Library
Library History *** Library Cover Page


Port Angeles, Washington Carnegie Library (1919 January 5 to 1998):

Although the city had been working on getting a library for the residents, no previous library existed when the Carnegie Library was funded by the Carnegie Corporation of New York at a cost of $12,500 (with an additional $500 coming from the city) on 1916 November 9; library opened on 1919 January 5. Carnegie Library, even with addition built in 1967, was deemed too small by 1998 when new library structure opened.

Carnegie Library Revitalization Project *** Port Angeles Branch Library


Rockport, Massachusetts Carnegie Library (1906 to 1993):

Andrew Carnegie provided a $10,000 grant to build a public library in Rockport, Massachusetts on 1903 June 18. Rockport did have a library previous to this grant. The Carnegie Library opened to the public on 1906 February 3. The total cost of the building was below the allocated $10,000; this was rare, as many times Andrew Carnegie had to provide additional funds to finish a Carnegie Library building.

An adult reading room was added to the west side of the building in January of 1964. At some point, during the building's history, a Children's Room was established in the building's basement. One of the well-known aspects of this Children's Room was a sculpture by Richard Recchia titled, "Mother Goose."

In 1993, the Rockport Public Library moved to new facilities at 17 School Street. Since that time, the original Carnegie Library building has been vacant and deteriorating, while town fathers considered a new use for the building. In 2006, the Town decided to put the property up for sale, as no public use could be found, and the Town could not afford to make the building accessible under terms of the Americans with Disabilities Act.

In August of 2007, a Florida couple offered to buy the building, at the half-million dollar asking price, to be used as a Summer residence. This plan has met with some opposition, including from the Rockport Historical Commission, which is concerned for the historical integrity of the building. Also, some members of the community wish to retain a footpath that runs close to the Carnegie Library building, for safe passage to a nearby church. Although the propective owners, originally, had no objections to public use of the footpath, their attorney has advised them that they could be held legally liable for accidents on the footpath.

As of late September, 2007, the sale has not yet concluded due to regulatory approvals needed, and the ongoing controversy.

Carnegie Library Building Sale Controversy:

* 2007 Sept. 28 - Gloucester Daily Times, Gloucester, Massachusetts:
Editorial
To save library, compromise is good
Don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good.
Regarding conversion of Rockport MA Carnegie Library into Summer home.

* 2007 Sept. 24 - Gloucester Daily Times, Gloucester, Massachusetts:
State Historical Commission to consider Carnegie Library plan

* 2007 Sept. 15 - Gloucester Daily Times, Gloucester, Massachusetts:
Letter-to-the-Editor: Ann Sheinwald, Broadway Street, Rockport
Letter: Carnegie footpath should be preserved

* 2007 Aug. 23 - Gloucester Daily Times, Gloucester, Massachusetts:
Couple offers $500K to turn Carnegie Library into summer home
By Jonathan L'Ecuyer

* 2006 Aug. 10 - CNHINS News:
For sale: History built with tycoon's cash
By Danielle Clark

***

Large Photograph of Carnegie Library Entrance

History of Carnegie Library Building (from " New England Carnegies" web site) *** History of the Rockport Public Library

Rockport Public Library


Carnegie Library, San Luis Obispo, California (1905 to 1955)
Today: San Luis Obispo County Historical Museum

Andrew Carnegie provided a grant of $10,000, on 1903 February 12, for the establishment of a Carnegie Library in San Luis Obispo, California. San Luis Obispo did have a public library prior to the Carnegie grant.

The Carnegie Library operated as a public library for 50 years, from 1905 through 1955. Following the move of the library to a new building, a county history museum was established in the Carnegie Library building, which continues to operate today.

Photographs and More History (From the Carnegie Libraries of California Web Site)


Warsaw Public Library, Warsaw, New York (1906)
A Carnegie library completed in 1906, it is now a part a part of the Pioneer Library System, a cooperative library system serving public libraries in Livingston, Ontario, Wayne, and Wyoming counties of New York State(Warsaw is in Wyoming County):
Official Web Site *** Library History


Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Cornish Branch (1915)

One of Winnipeg's two Carnegie Library buildings, both opened in 1915. According to Carnegie Library supporter, Linda F. Sigurdson Collette, the Cornish branch is located in the core of the City of Winnipeg and "A number of well-known Canadian authors have called it home. Nellie McClung and several women held meetings there in 1915 and in Janaury, 1916, succeeded in having the women in Manitoba enfranchised. The first in Canada." Some Winnipeg Public Library branches, including the Cornish branch, have been at risk for closure, including as recently as 2004; however, the community has successfully rallied to prevent the library's closure.:

Photo and Library Information



Academic and School Libraries Funded by Andrew Carnegie

A limited number of academic or school libraries were also constructed with funds granted by Andrew Carnegie. Additionally, Andrew Carnegie indirectly funded a limited number of academic libraries with his support of the founding of institutions of higher learning.

In Pittsburgh, Andrew Carnegie founded the Carnegie Technical Schools in 1900, later called the Carnegie Institute of Technology, and today known as Carnegie Mellon University. With his great interest in fostering technical education, Andrew Carnegie also funded half the cost of the founding of the Franklin Union in Boston which was dedicated on 1908 September 25, later called Franklin Institute, and now known as the Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology. Benjamin Franklin had been one of Andrew Carnegie's heroes, so Mr. Carnegie was delighted to offer to assist in the founding of this technical school, when it became known that the money from Mr. Franklin's bequest was insufficient.

The following are a few other academic or school libraries which received funding from Andrew Carnegie:


Andrew Carnegie Library of Livingstone College, Salisbury, North Carolina (1908)

The Andrew Carnegie Library was constructed in 1908 as the academic library of Livingstone College, a small African-American college in Salisbury, North Carolina. This was the only academic library permitted to use the donor's first name as part of the name of the library and one of only two libraries, constructed by Andrew Carnegie, to have that honor. The only other library permitted to use the donor's first name as part of the name of the library (and, hence, the only public library to hold that honor) is the Andrew Carnegie Free Library and Music Hall in Carnegie, Pennsylvania (a suburb of Pittsburgh).

Andrew Carnegie Library: Home Page *** Library History

Livingstone College


Carnegie Building of Pomona College, Claremont, California (1908)

Served as a combined academic library for Pomona College and a public library for the City of Claremont from 1908 to 1914, when a branch of the Los Angeles County Library opened in Claremont. The Carnegie Library continued as an academic library until 1953. It is now used as an academic building on the Pomona College campus.

Photograph and more history from Carnegie Libraries of California web site.


Carnegie Library of Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa (1905)

In 1905, Andrew Carnegie provided $50,000 for construction of a library to serve the needs of Cornell College as well as the needs of the citizens of Mount Vernon, Iowa. This Carnegie Library remained a dual-use library until 1957 when the new Cole Library was built. Cole Library continued the tradition of being available to both Cornell College students and Mount Vernon residents, and this "gentleman's agreement" was finally formalized in 2001.

Russell D. Cole Library: academic library *** Mount Vernon Public Library

Cornell College *** College Sesquicentennial Web Site

* 2001 May 14 - Cole Library, Cornell College:
Cornell's Cole Library celebrates new status as official Mount Vernon Public Library
New city ordinance formalizes the gentleman's agreement that has existed between Cornell and Mount Vernon since 1905, when the Carnegie Library opened on campus.


Carnegie Library of Davidson College, Davidson, North Carolina
(1910 to 1941)

From small library collections in 1837 and 1841 to the first major library on campus, the Union Library located on the second floor of the newly-built Chambers Building in 1860, the need for a dedicated building for library services was finally met with the construction of the college's Carnegie Library in 1910. Construction began in 1909 after raising a library endowment and receiving a $20,000 library grant from Andrew Carnegie. When space for the library, again, became a problem in 1929, the Hugh A. and Jane Parks Grey Library was completed in 1941. After a brief use as a student union, the original Carnegie Library building has since been used as a guest house for visitors to the college.

History of Carnegie Library, Davidson College *** History of the Libraries of Davidson College

Davidson College


Carnegie Library of Ohio University, Athens, Ohio
(1905 June 14)

On 1903 December 16, Andrew Carnegie provided $30,000 for construction of a library at Ohio University, that was to be used by both the university community and be open to "all Athens (Ohio) citizens, school teachers, and children" (Athens had not, previously, had a public library). Unlike other academic library grants, this grant was made through the public library grant program. Ohio University, the village of Athens, and the local board of education, each, pledged $1,000 per year in annual support of the library. The building was dedicated on 1905 June 14 and served as a public library until the construction of Chubb Library in 1930. Chubb Library became the official library of Ohio University, but due to Andrew Carnegie's original stipulation it retained a "City Section" for non-university residents. This Ohio University academic/public library lasted until a county library system was formed in 1935, with a branch library in Athens; Chubb Library then became strictly a university library.

The original Carnegie Library building was renovated and used as a classroom building, following construction of Chubb Library. The building was renamed Carnegie Hall in 1936. After a second renovation in 1985, it was renamed Scripps Hall and became the home of the E. W. Scripps School of Journalism, with the rededication 1986 May 2.

History of Carnegie Library/Carnegie Hall/Scripps Hall: Link 1 *** Link 2 *** Link 3

Athens County Public Library *** Athens Public Library Branch *** Friends of the Athens Public Library

Ohio University


The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh: The Library Center at Point Park University, Pittsburgh
(1997 to 2004)

With a special grant from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, several historic bank buildings in Downtown Pittsburgh's original Fourth Avenue/Wood Street Financial District were renovated to become a combined academic library and public library, serving the needs of the students of Point Park University (originally Point Park College) and residents and employees working in Downtown Pittsburgh's "Golden Triangle." This library became the primary library for Point Park University and the Downtown and Business Branches for The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh. The Main Library of Carnegie Library continued in the historic building Andrew Carnegie built, in 1895, in the Oakland Civic Center district (appox. three miles east of Downtown), while the Allegheny Regional Branch (original main library of the separate city of Allegheny, which was annexed to become Pittsburgh's North Side in 1907) continued serving residents a mile to the north, in the historic building Andrew Carnegie built, in 1890, for the neighborhood where he grew-up.

Renamed "The Library Center" this was the first partnership between an existing college and an existing public library in the country. Originally, these buildings had held several major Pittsburgh banks at the turn of the nineteenth-to-twentieth centuries. Through mergers, many of these bank buildings were abandoned and in the 1970s, these bank buildings, together, became an in-town shopping mall called "The Bank Center." However, by the 1990s, this shopping mall slowly went out of business. The owner of the properties gifted the buildings to the adjancent Point Park College. Point Park then discussed the possibility of moving its Helen J. Moore Library into these buildings with the Downtown and Business Branches of Carnegie Library, which at that time were operating in the entry concourse of the newly-built Steel Plaza Subway Station. An arrangement was made that Point Park would be responsible for maintaining the buildings while Carnegie Library would actually operate the combined library, which included the collections from both the Point Park library and the Downtown and Business Branches of Carnegie Library.

Regrettably, new Carnegie Library management in 2004 decided to end this public/private collaboration, as a cost-cutting measure. The Downtown and Business Branches of Carnegie Library were moved to a new site on Smithfield Street, directly across from a Barnes and Noble Bookstore (which closed in 2006). Point Park University continues operating their university library in the collection of historic bank buildings, which are now called University Center.

Point Park University *** Point Park University Library

The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh: Official Web Site *** Downtown and Business Branches


Carnegie Library of Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York
(1907 September)

In March of 1905, Andrew Carnegie granted $150,000 for a new and larger library, to support expanded needs, on the campus of Syracuse University. The grant was conditioned on the University supplying a dollar-for-dollar match for an endowment for the maintenance and upkeep of the Library. The Library opened for student use in September of 1907.

History of Syracuse University Libraries including the Carnegie Library

Carnegie Library Building: Now home to the Science and Technology Library

Carnegie Library Centennial (2007): News Release *** Events

Syracuse University

* 2007 Oct. 5 - The Daily Orange, Syracuse University:
Cake, math books make for a unique 100th birthday celebration
By Ronna Weyland

* 2007 Oct. 4 - The Daily Orange, Syracuse University:
Carnegie Library to celebrate 100th birthday
By Justin Perrelli


Margaret Carnegie Library Building of Mills College, Oakland, California (1906)

Named for Andrew Carnegie's only daughter, Margaret, The Margaret Carnegie Library served as an academic library for Mills College from 1906 to 1989. In fact, major earthquakes in both the beginning and ending years of its tenure as a library are a major part of the history of this library! Although this building now houses administrative offices, the second floor still includes some special library collections.

Photograph and more history from Carnegie Libraries of California web site.


New England Carnegies - Academic & Former Academic Library Buildings


Seaboard Airline Railway Free Traveling Library System
Serving schools and other stations in Georgia, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Florida, and Alabama.
(1898 to 1955)

A unique library system which was started by a dedicated Georgia belle by the name of Mrs. Eugene B. (Sally) Heard at Rose Hill Plantation near Middleton, Georgia in 1898. She saw a desparate need of people in the rural areas, in the southeastern United States, for books, and she tooks steps to meet that need. This included convincing Everitte St. John, Vice-President of the Seaboard Airline Railway, to distribute the books for no charge all along the railroads lines.

It also included convincing publishers to provide books and magazines, for no charge, for distribution to these small library stations. Between 1899 and 1909, Andrew Carnegie also provided $4,000,000 worth of books for this unique library system.

With the formation of county and regional public libraries in most of these communities, the library system ended in 1955.

History of the Seaboard Airline Railway Free Traveling Library System

History of the Seaboard Airline Railway Network


Andrew Carnegie and Carnegie Libraries Photo Album

History of Astronomer, Educator, and Optician John A. Brashear
Friend of Andrew Carnegie

History of The Duquesne Incline, Pittsburgh
Historic Cable Car Railway Serving Commuters and Tourists since 1877 !

History of The Buhl Planetarium and Institute of Popular Science, Pittsburgh
America's Fifth Major Planetarium(1939)

History of The Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago
America's First Major Planetarium(1930)

Other History Links

Return to Cover Page of History of Andrew Carnegie and Carnegie Libraries



Disclaimer Statement: This Internet Web page is not affiliated with the
Andrew Carnegie Free Library, Henry Buhl, Jr. Planetarium and Observatory, The Carnegie Science Center,
The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, or The Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh/Carnegie Institute.

This Internet, World Wide Web Site administered by Glenn A. Walsh.
Unless otherwise indicated, all web pages in this account are ?Copyright 2000, Glenn A. Walsh, All Rights Reserved.
Additions and corrections to: gawalsh@andrewcarnegie.cc

Last modified : Thursday, 25-Oct-2012 19:58:15 EDT.